How Much Does a Roof Cost?


Photo credit: Alan Light
Photo credit: Alan Light

We recently gave you lots of information about how to gauge a roof replacement. But first we need to examine how much does a roof cost? What are the materials used and which option will be the best fit for your home? Heck, what’s the national average for mid-range and upscale roof replacements anyway?

“How much does a roof cost,” is probably one of the most common questions we receive here at HomeProHub. That’s why today we’re going to show you the materials you can choose from and additional tips to make sure your next roof replacement can withstand all conditions.

A Little Weather Won’t Faze These Roofing Materials

Asphalt

Asphalt is probably one of the most widely utilized and affordable roofing materials. The shingles are nailed down in rows that overlap. The downside is that many homeowners don’t find asphalt to be very pleasing to the eye. They also don’t last very long.

Slate

Created out of thin pieces of natural stone, slate roofs are quite beautiful. They have an exceptionally long lifespan, even without routine maintenance. It’s important to note that the material can be rather expensive and because it’s so heavy you’ll need professional installers for the job.

Metal

Flush with up to a 50-year warranty, metal roofs requires little to no maintenance. Although it can cost you a bit more upfront, this roofing material is very durable and can last for years and years.

Wood

Wood shingles (or “shakes” as they are often called) are often used because of their beautiful appearance. Often made from oak or cedar, this material requires a lot of maintenance to repair rot that occurs naturally over the years.

Tiles

Tiles are very sturdy and durable; they’re also fire-resistant and fantastic insulators. One thing to note is that this material is incredibly heavy, which means the structure of the roof must often be reinforced.

Rubber

Rubber is an ideal material for flat roofs. It’s very resistant to leaks and can last for decades with very little maintenance. One downside is that they aren’t all that aesthetically pleasing.

So How Much Does a Roof Cost?

Now that you’ve learned about the different materials, let’s look at the national average for a mid-range and an upscale roof replacement, as well as what you’ll get for your hard-earned dollar:

Mid-Range Roof

  • Average cost is $21,488
  • You won’t attain the best ROI (return on investment) because of the wear and tear, although the resale value will hold strong for about the first five years
  • The project will consists of:
    • Removing the old roof
    • Disposing all of the waste
    • Putting on a whole new roof

Upscale Roof

  • Average cost is $38,022
  • Almost the exact same ROI as a mid-range roofing project
    • The better the roofing material the better the resale value
  • You usually get a unique beautification for your home
  • More of a custom and (in some cases) original look

HomeProHub’s Unbiased Advice

As you can see, there are a lot of answers to address the question, “How much does a roof cost?” Depending on the location of your home, not all of the above options would make sense. Who knows, maybe even steel roofing is a good choice. It’s always important to keep in mind what the rest of your neighborhood is doing, what your budget currently is, and what your local contractors have the ability to perform. Some techniques are so new that contractors capable of performing the work might not be in your area.

If you need additional advice for new roofs and how to find the right contractor to install it, contact HomeProHub today.

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